Trip to the Outhouse’s Favorite Players of World Cup 2010 (Yup, there are some redeeming factors)

Another weekend in full force, with summer baking (actually here in southeast Texas, summer steams more often than bakes) most everything outside, I’ve cranked down the AC inside and “chillin'” on this Saturday afternoon.

I’ve just finished watching the 3rd Place World Cup game–and that’s a big lie, I clicked over less than three times to see what the score was.  The first time the national anthems of Uruguay and Germany were being played, so the score must have been 0-0, or nil-nil, as they like to say in Futbol-speak.  Then I clicked it over later to watch all the excitement, but, alas, too late, I was, and the game was over with the Germans weinerschnitzeling the South Americans 3-2.

I’ve kind of worn out my opinion of soccer in an earlier post. (See here.)  But, we must, I say, give credit where credit is due, and place the laurel crowns where they are deserved.  And too, it’s been awhile since I’ve posted here just for prurient interests.

So without further ado, here are Trip to the Outhouse’s Favorite Players of World Cup 2010:

Piotr Trochowski, member of the German team that placed 3rd

Robin van Persie, member of the Dutch team, which was defeated by Spain in the championship game

Lukas Podolski, teammate of Trochowski

Carlos Bocanegra of Team USA, which made it out of the group rounds only to lose to Ghana

Ahmadinejad and Chavez: A Love Feast of Dictators, and Don’t Forget the Hezbollah Appetizers

"Meet me behind the hotel at 11 o'clock, and we'll see what other conniving we can do."

"Meet me behind the hotel at 11 o'clock, and we'll see what other conniving we can do."

Knowing a second language has a lot of benefits, and for far too long, most Americans have stuck their heads in the sand and thought because they know English, they have an advantage and don’t have to learn another language.  However, being fluent in two or more languages opens up so much more of the world.

Personally, I read a number of foreign language sites every day; some are news sites and some focus on some topic or interest that I have.

Usually at night time, I check abc.es, an online news site from Spain.  That way I can see what is happening in the world, usually before sites like cnn.com or msnbc.com pick it up.  Reading the news out of another country also gives a different perspective and often there is news that isn’t even highlighted by the U.S. media.

Such was the case in an article I read last night: Arranca la gira de Lieberman para frenar la expansión de Irán en América Latina, which tells about Israel’s Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman’s 10-day visit to Brazil, Argentina, Peru and Colombia.  (Read a similar AP article in English.)

What I didn’t realize before reading the article, but have since corroborated through other sources is how much influence Iran and the Lebanese terrorist group Hezbollah, which Iran backs, have in Latin America.  Apparently, Hugo Chavez of Venezuela and Iran’s Mahmoud Ahmadinejad have become BFFs and anyone who has been paying attention knows that both of these guys have found ways to manipulate the systems of their countries in order to stay in power. Hezbollah, for its part, because of connections with Lebanese immigrants to countries like Venezuela, seems to have gotten involved in that old Latin American standby–kidnapping; and not unlike other rebel/narco-terrorist groups (i. e. FARC in Colombia), uses the ransom money extorted from victims’ families as a way of supporting itself.  (Check out this in-depth article for more details.)

Chavez and Ahmadinejad negotiated a number of deals, and it’s not difficult for those who keep up with current events to see what is going on.  Chavez already has his emulators in office in several of the Latin American countries, the latest being Zelaya from Honduras.  And although there are those who are decrying the coup that pushed him out of the country as being un-democratic, what Zelaya was doing was trying to circumvent his own country’s constitution in order to allow himself to stay in office longer, nothing different than what Chavez did a few years back.  These guys don’t really want democracy built upon a long-standing constitution; they want to create their own “democracy”, which in effect validates their dictatorship. 

As for Ahmadinejad, anyone who is not aware of the corruption in the last election in Iran is walking around with blinders on, but what goes for democracy in Iran is only pretense anyway; there is no democracy when a malevolent theocracy is in place.

As citizens of this world, we need to remain informed, as having as much information as we can is a big part of maintaining our freedom and a way to make decisions about who we support or don’t support as leaders in our own countries.  And with the Internet, we also have the ability to access many sources besides our daily print newspaper.  Of course, we must also be able to judge the veracity of these sources and extricate the biases inherent in them.

Lest you think I have some kind of slant here based on religion or otherwise, let me say, “I don’t”.  From my own personal viewpoint, I see that these guys are bad guys, bad guys who want to have power and control over millions of peoples’ lives.  And, yes, the U.S. government doesn’t like these guys either, but in reality, they are not so different from Pinochet or Marcos, whom the Reagan and Thatcher governments supported only 20-some years ago.

A dictator is a dictator is a dictator and they are like noxious weeds in the gardens of this planet.

“Chiki Chiki” or “Chiki Bollo”? Make Your Choice Whatever It Is, But Come On, Y’all–Let’s Lighten Up For Awhile

Rodolfo Chilikicuatre

Rodolfo Chikilicuatre

The world can get a little “heavy” with people thinking about the swine flu, the economy, a couple of wars going on, and who knows what other worrisome things. Sometimes it feels like we all just need to “lighten up”, step back, and maybe dance.

The Spaniards have always been people who know how to help the world to have a good time. After all, they were the ones who brought us “The Macarena”. And not so many years ago, out of Spain came the Ketchup Girls (Las Ketchup) with their pig-Latinish hit “Asereje”.

Somehow I missed it, but Spain’s entry in the 2008 Eurovision contest has to be the follow-up to “La Macarena” and “Asereje”, but it still has a chance of making it across the Atlantic, as a lot of European “summer songs” take a whole year to become popular in the U.S.

Most Americans are unfamiliar with the Eurovision competetion. It’s something like the World Cup of music for Europeans. Every country has a national competition and sends its best competitor and song, usually pop or ballads, to the big European finals.

In 2008, Spain’s entry was Rodofo Chikilicuatre (who is really the  comedian David Fernández) with the song “El Chiki Chiki”. “El Chiki Chiki” is actually one of those spoof songs (sorta like “Grandma Got Run Overy by a Reindeer”–I say “sorta”) that got very popular. This guy will make you laugh if nothing else. Check out the tranlation into English here. There’s even been a gay version called “El Chiki Bollo”.

We all get too serious sometimes. If just one or two of you get a little chuckle or get your feet moving, it will be worth trying to finish this post late on a Sunday . . . oops, already Monday. And hey, it doesn’t matter whether you’re bilingual, trilingual, or even “no lingual”, you’re going to like these.

In case you forgot, here’s the Ketchup Girls:

And “El Chiki Chiki”:

And “El Chiki Bollo”:

Here are the words to “El Chiki Bollo”, which I got from a Spanish lesbian blog, I’ll try to translate them later, but basically, the idea is to dance your way out of the closet. You gotta love it!

Bollera! Bollera!

Salir del armario cuesta mogollón

No salen en la China y tampoco en Alcorcón.

No salen las ministras, no salen deportistas,

no salen periodistas, ni tampoco las artistas,

y del armario se sale así:

Uno: abre la puerta (One: open the door)

Dos: salte pa’ fuera (Two: jump out)

Tres: respira hondo (Three: take a deep breath)

Cuatro: ponte a vivir (Four: start living!)

Bollera, bollera,

Sal mi hermana, sal mi hermano

Sal del armario con las bragas en la mano

Las hay en la ciudad, las hay en los pueblos

las hay en los desiertos

y también en los conventos,

y del armario se sale así:

Uno: abre la puerta

Dos: salte pa’ fuera

Tres: respira hondo

Cuatro: ponte a vivir

Bolleras, Pa fuera, pa la calle

“We all are equal and we all are different”

I’m not a movie goer. Maybe because I’m such a channel flipper. When I get into that theatre, there are no remote controls, so if the film is less than exciting, I either have to sit there waiting for something to happen, or if the whole thing is more than I can stand, I just walk out. So I’m not a movie goer.

I don’t really like Hollywood movies much either. No matter what the story-line might be, most American movies follow a predictable pattern: introduce the situation, bring in the conflict, resolve the conflict; audience goes home.

The movies I like are generally in the “foreign film” genre, and many of them never make it to the local theatres, so I have to hunt for them. I found this trailer (When did they start calling them trailers instead of previews?) for a Spanish film shown at a sneak preview for the 2009 Latin Gay Film Festival in Miami. (Take a look at the site. If the festival is as attractive as the site, it’s sure to be “festive”.)

The trailer for Spinnin’ (6000 Millones de Personas Diferentes) is almost like a short film itself, and definitely worth the 6 or 7 minutes it takes to watch (sub-titled for the Spanish-impaired).

Watch E-namorarte–the Spanish Soap Opera Made Just for the Internet Right Here on My Vid Box

Puedes ver la cibornovela, E-namorarte, aqui en mi Vid Box. Hecho en España especialmente para la red, cuenta con 40 capitulos de 3 minutos cada uno. La trama contiene conflictos generaciones, muchos tipos de gustos sexuales y otros temas. Puedes ver todos los capitulos dentro de mi Vid Box. Empieza con el primero 1×01 aqui a la derecha.

You can watch the soap opera, E-namorarte, right here in my Vid Box. It was made in Spain specifically for the Internet, and it’s composed of 40 short episodes of 3 minutes each. The story is a comedy centering on the lives of various characters of a variety of sexual persuasions. You can see Episode 1×01 by clicking on it right here on the right; then go inside (click at the bottom of the box) to watch the others.